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[Meg: Hell's Aquarium] [by: Steve Alten] (Inglese) Copertina flessibile – 1 mag 2010

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Copertina flessibile, 1 mag 2010
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Amazon.com: 201 recensioni
12 di 13 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
One "Hell" of a Ride 13 giugno 2009
Di D. J. Donovan - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida
Steve's research on prehistoric sea monsters is beyond belief. Then being able to wrap an exciting,entertaining,informative and suspense filled fictional story around all this fact made this the best MEG in the series. If you thought MEG's were really bad, just wait till you see what Steve presents in this episodic adventure in "Hell's Aquarium". The first half sets you up, the last half you can't put it down. Be prepared for one Hell of a Ride !!
24 di 30 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
Hell's Aquarium will unlock a prehistoric hunger within you for the next in the series... NOW! 12 maggio 2009
Di Jeffrey A. Sitko - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
As an enthusiast of both paleontology and ichthyology the MEG series has been a staple of my literary diet. The first book established a mythos that I adored, the second remains one of my all-time favorite novels, and the third is quite plainly a fun read of non-stop excitement.

For the sake of candor, I should admit that since having read the third book and the preview for Hell's Aquarium online, I have been apprehensive regarding this book and specifically the newest terrifying denizen of the deep in the MEG series - the Liopleurodon. In point of fact, I think the only reason that I didn't enjoy the third book as much was because I couldn't get around the fact that there was supposedly a predator existing in the depths of the Philippine sea in excess of 120 feet! Immediately a nagging voice was unearthed in the back of my mind, screaming, "There is no such creature known to exist!" Following that, the online free preview both tantalized me with Steve's writing style and the characters that I have come to adore, and caused me to be still more unnerved, discovering the 120-foot monster to be a Liopleurodon with a skull in excess of 30 feet! I became confused instantaneously; the series with such an eye to attracting fans of prehistoric aquatic fauna is featuring a grossly paleontologically inaccurate specimen, hyping the Liopleurodon to more than twice the size of what we know for even the largest specimen of this pliosaur? However, with tens of millions of years for this animal to evolve if left undisturbed in a subterranean sea, who is to say that its size couldn't increase? I remained hopeful that Steve would provide an explanation... and provide he did! My one fear and quibble for the book laid to rest in an evolutionarily plausible fashion, I may now go back and reread Primal Waters so that I can fully appreciate that book without being concerned with an inaccurate leviathan of ludicrous proportions!

With "the bad" (if the above worry could even have been considered as much) out of the way, I should move on to the good... which literally is the ENTIRE book. Hell's Aquarium is the singularly most enthralling novel I have read since The Trench, steering the series into uncharted waters of infinite possibility. Angel is back in all her rapacious, cantankerous glory, but the creatures I found myself yearning to read about just as much as Angel were her offspring, particularly her larger two female pups, Belle and Lizzy, referred to by the Tanaka Institute staff as "the sisters". What's compelling about the sisters is that we see them not only as Megalodons but as animals with distinct personalities which make them memorable and enticing for the reader. Long have we seen Megalodons as fiercely territorial and solitary; now we see the sisters in a symbiotic predatory relationship. Belle is the brawn to Lizzy's brain. Lizzy appears strategic and calculating in attacks, while Belle is pure, unbridled primal fury.

All of the main characters are back, with David now 20 years old and donning the mantle of main protagonist (Jonas coming in at a close second). This book seems to groom David as the Taylor we'll be following most closely in future books as Jonas advances in years and becomes less capable of taking on these apex predators and coming out unscathed. A glut of new and memorable characters are present, including bi-polar Monty whom David befriends on his trip to Dubai, their relationship echoing that between Jonas and Mac. From the Monterey bay to Dubai, this book ceaselessly churns out intrigue and action in a manner that fans of the series will swarm about as if it were chum!
3 di 3 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
Every Chapter Is A Killing 24 marzo 2011
Di C. Chow - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile
Every Chapter Is A Killing

If you're into sci-fi, sea monsters, or just plain adventure, `Hell's Aquarium' is a novel with non stop action which gives the audience what it wants. Plenty of sea monsters and most importantly sea monsters eating people!

The plot: The novel actually focuses on two parallel stories about two sea monster aquariums. As you might know, Dubai is currently trying to outdo the world in tourist attractions. They're plan is to release a Jurassic Park style aquarium. The big problem is that they can't grow the sea monsters in a test tube, they have to go out and catch them! We'll that's a lot more fun than `West World' rehashed.

Of course as anyone who's into cryptozoology knows sea monsters really do exist. (Or rather we want them to exist.)

The Dubai royal family has the perfect crew for the job. The Taylors. When the Taylors refuse their money they find other ways to "persuade" the Taylors.

But that's just one part of the story. At the same time the other Taylors are in sunny California running their own sea monster theme park. Perhaps this is the real Hell's Aquarium.

The Talyors run a Sea World like theme park with live shows not featuring a killer whale but a 72 foot megalodon named Angel, and her five daughters. How dangerous is this. As I said about every ten pages or every live show at least one innocent person dies a bloody death. Of course this only boosts the park's popularity!

The Talyors seem grief stricken by each death but continue to keep the park open claiming they can't simply release these monsters into the wild.

If the Talyors don't have enough problems the park is under attack by eco-terrorists whom want to "free the megaladons." Take a wild guess what happens to them!

`Hell's Aquarium' one of the few books which can truly be called non stop action. There's so much going on! People are being eaten left and right whether they're hunting sea monsters or trying to play with them.

Like most best selling authors, Steve Alten's writing style and character development is so-so. His true genius is in giving the readers what they want. He focuses very little on the human characters, the Taylors could switch to the Smiths half way through an it wouldn't matter. Alten focuses on the sea monsters, the real stars of the story! Good!

Cryptozoologists or paleontologists, will be very impressed with Alten's wide menagerie of prehistoric monsters. The novel is also illustrated while really helps. This would make a great Hollywood film.
12 di 16 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
Better than Primal Waters, but... 4 novembre 2009
Di Ms. M. L. Hyndman - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
There's no denying that Steve Alten is a good writer. His take on the whole 'does Megalodon still exist' business as an entertainment for the masses weaned on JAWS (and its numerous imitators) was a brilliant one - at least to begin with. MEG was good, THE TRENCH even better and I very much looked forward to the third book PRIMAL WATERS, which was a disappointment. Why? It seems Mr. Alten is not content with writing a good book, rather a screenplay masquerading as a novel. Does this have anything to do with Disney and New Line Cinema passing on the option to make the first film or maybe he's just hoping to add an enthusiastic producer (or two) to his readership - who knows? The fact remains, the problems that marred PRIMAL WATERS repeat themselves with HELL'S AQUARIUM. Though I applaud the attempt to develop the characters beyond the simple heroics of the first book, HELL'S AQUARIUM misses the dark complexity the character of Celeste and her cronies gave THE TRENCH and loses a great deal of its tension through too much discription and liberal use of exclamation marks. If someone is about to get eaten by a steam locomotive with a mouth-full of steak knives, I think it safe to assume the result would be fatal. For a mature reader well versed in this sort of thing, it never fails to irritate. Despite its flaws, HELL'S AQUARIUM is a decent enough read, with plenty of inventive action for the devoted topped by a ending wide enough for another book. Great - I just hope its better than the last one
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
One hell of a ride 14 luglio 2010
Di Toby G. Tate - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile
Miles below the crushing depths of the Philippine Sea, hidden beneath the crust of the Philippine Sea Plate, monsters dwell that should have died 65 million years ago. Luckily for us, they didn't.

If you like your monsters big, mean and prehistoric, Steve Alten's "Meg: Hell's Aquarium" delivers the goods. It also effectively illustrates the point that there is always a bigger fish in the sea.

A follow up to Alten's "Meg: Primal Waters," Hell's Aquarium continues the story of Jonas Taylor, the deep sea diver/ paleontologist who first discovered giant Megalodons, prehistoric cousins of the Great White Shark, on a top-secret dive to the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean.

Taylor, the lone survivor of the doomed Navy expedition, is demonized and ridiculed for what he says he saw--until he becomes a paleontologist and manages to find one of the Megs again years later. The Meg follows Taylor to the surface and chaos ensues.
Taylor, along with his wife, Terry and daughter, Dani, is now running his own aquarium, the Tanaka Institute in California, with his own captured Megs--the 76-foot, 50-ton Angel and her brood of "pups," Angelica, Lizzie, Mary Kate, Ashley and Belle.

The story begins with the Meg from Angel's first litter, Scarface, becoming lunch for something much, much larger--a creature known as a pliosaur--one of a menagerie of prehistoric creatures that have been discovered to inhabit a vast sea beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. These creatures, it seems, who were once air breathers, have evolved gill slits, which enabled them to stay hidden and procreate all these millions of years.

Now, an Arab gentleman by the name of Fiesal Bin Rashidi, who also happens to be filthy rich and a relation of the Prince of Dubai, has built an enormous aquarium in Dubai, big enough to house these monsters from the deep. Who does he want to enlist to help capture these creatures? Not Jonas Taylor, as you would suspect, but his son, twenty-year-old David, who is home from college on summer vacation. David also happens to be an expert pilot of a new high-tech sub called a Manta Ray, which can withstand the tremendous pressures at the bottom of the Pacific.

David is enlisted, against the will of his father, to help train a team of pilots to dive deeper than any man (or woman) has ever gone before and lure these dangerous creatures into an array of awaiting nets. Unfortunately, once these pilots get down to a few thousand feet, they wig out because of the claustrophobic darkness and the very real possibility of becoming a snack for a sea serpent. It seems David and his newfound girlfriend, Kaylie, a navigator and pilot in her own right, are the only ones who are up to the task. But of course, all does not go as planned.

As if they didn't have enough problems, it seems Jonas' fish at the Tanaka Institute are becoming restless and the holding pens are becoming too small for the steadily growing Megs and their ginormous mother. An overzealous animal rights group (called R.A.W.) is also pushing the institute to release the Megs back into the wild and possess no scruples about their methods.

Well, I won't give away the rest, but suffice it to say that the biggest showdown of all time eventually ensues.

A literary agent once told me that you shouldn't have too much killing at the beginning of a horror book; you should build up to it. But since this is science fiction, I guess the rule doesn't apply, and that's great, because everyone wants to get to the part where the Megs start chowing down. Am I right? It does tend to get a bit graphic, but I don't think there is really a non-graphic way to describe a giant fish eating people.

Even though Jonas is 66, I figure if Harrison Ford can still be Indiana Jones, then Jonas Taylor can still pilot a sub and tame a giant shark or two. I realize that David will probably eventually assume Jonas' role just as Mutt will probably assume Indy's role and Dirk Pitt, Jr. will assume the role of his father in Clive Cussler's adventures.

One thing I love about Steve Alten is the research he does for his books. The man does have a Ph.D., so I assume he knows how to do research. I actually learn things when I read his books--Domain, Goliath, The Loch--just like I always did with Michael Crichton, one of my all-time favorite authors.

I've read pretty much all of Mr. Alten's books and I can say unequivocally that this is his best yet. This book moves along at a great clip and has excellent character development. It's not a throw-away, run-of-the-mill page-turner--it's a book that will stand the test of time.

Now out in paperback at about 500 pages, Hell's Aquarium features two different collectible covers and retails for $[...].

Check out Steve's Web site at [...].

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