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33 Revolutions Per Minute: A History of Protest Songs, from Billie Holiday to Green Day (Inglese) Copertina flessibile – 5 apr 2011

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3,8 su 5 stelle 17 recensioni clienti su Amazon.com us-flag |

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Descrizione prodotto

Recensione

“This book is impressive in scope.” (New Yorker)

“A longtime music critic, Lynskey presents up-close details to ballast the book’s larger historical sweep.” (Los Angeles Times)

“Lynskey has a strong command of the music and its makers.” (Wall Street Journal)

“lovely writing…Let’s praise the agile, many-tentacled writer Mr. Lynskey can often be, because I loved bits of this book; you can pluck out the many tasty things like seeds from a pomegranate.” (New York Times)

“British music critic Dorian Lynskey offers a completely absorbing look at 33 songs, spanning seven decades and haling from five continents...Comprehensive and beautifully written.” (Booklist (starred review))

“[A] provocative, absorbing book” (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

“A must-read for militant-music lovers.” (The Root)

Dalla quarta di copertina

From one of the United Kingdom’s most prominent music critics, a page-turning and wonderfully researched history of 33 songs that have transformed the world through the twentieth century and beyond.

When pop music meets politics, the results are often thrilling, sometimes life-changing, and never simple. The protest songs of such great artists as Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Stevie Wonder, U2, Public Enemy, Fela Kuti, R.E.M., Rage Against the Machine, and the Clash represent pop music at its most charged and relevant, providing the soundtrack and informing social change since the 1930s. They capture the attention and passions of listeners, force their way into the news, and make their presence felt from the streets to the corridors of power.

33 Revolutions Per Minute is a history of protest music embodied in 33 songs that span seven decades and four continents, from Billie Holiday crooning "Strange Fruit" before a shocked audience to Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young paying tribute to the Vietnam protesters killed at Kent State in "Ohio," to Green Day railing against President Bush and twenty-first-century media in "American Idiot." With the aid of exclusive new interviews, Dorian Lynskey explores the individuals, ideas, and events behind each song. This expansive survey examines how music has engaged with racial unrest, nuclear paranoia, apartheid, war, poverty, and oppression, offering hope, stirring anger, inciting action, and producing songs that continue to resonate years down the line, sometimes at great cost to the musicians involved.

For the audience who embraced Alex Ross's The Rest Is Noise, Bob Dylan's Chronicles, or Simon Reynolds's Rip It Up and Start Again, 33 Revolutions Per Minute is an absorbing and moving account of 33 songs that made history.

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Le recensioni clienti più utili su Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.8 su 5 stelle 17 recensioni
5.0 su 5 stelle A Lot Tackled in a Manner That Makes You Laugh and Think 21 febbraio 2014
Di Kindle Customer - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
I realize that 5 starts is the max, however, for me this book hit all the marks. It uses just over 30 songs spanning from the late 1930s until the early 2010's as catalysts for a myriad of songs, artists and styles that created what can be called protest music. The writing is crisp and concise and includes dozens upon dozens of quotes from the artists themselves. Lynskey's voice as historian is strong as he succeeds in not only putting each song in context of the social and historic times in which it was written or propagated, but he also places these songs as complements, contrasts and comparisons to other ages and eras of pop music, politics and culture. Lastly, I was glad that he accounts for his scope in the introduction where he lets us know that he will be covering specific areas of the world, but not the entire planet! The U.S., UK, Jamaica and Africa are well documented and pleasingly fills the text. I would be curious how he would cover Pussy Riot's story as they are a realized culmination of so many aspects of so many artists that he covers in his book.
5.0 su 5 stelle with great competence and great humility 1 febbraio 2015
Di DAW - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
No one interested in how pop-culture affects society, a vastly ignored subject by social scientists, can afford NOT to include this on their bookshelf. Linsky quite humbly invites us to share his assessment of music concerned with politics and humanity, with great competence and great humility. The printed book includes a fine set of photographs.
5.0 su 5 stelle Five Stars 19 luglio 2016
Di John Carpenter - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
Thanks
25 di 28 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
3.0 su 5 stelle Sans "And A Third" 1 giugno 2011
Di Donald S. Handy - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
This is A, rather than THE, history of protest songs.

At its best, the book is informative. Even if you hate a particular song and/or artist, the author manages to keeps one's interest in reading about it/them. In part this is due to his scatter-shot approach, encompassing eras and genres. It is also well-researched.

Where it fails is in the balance of history. There are far too many relatively recent songs included. That Phil Ochs wasn't granted a chapter, while Frankie Goes To Hollywood was, is criminal. Broadside magazine is hardly even mentioned, while the author goes out of his way to include an obscure disco song, as well as U#2's "Pride (In The Name of Love)," which isn't even a protest song but, rather, a song of celebration. So why include it? I suspect it's for the same reason that the book is so laden with relatively recent songs, that the main concern was the bottom line. Most people will want to read about songs that they're familiar with.

So the blues, a form of music that, by it's very nature, is a protest, is totally ignored. Part of this is probably due to the author's definition of protest music, which he links to politics. There are, of course, other forms of revolution, such as cultural and social, but the author chooses to put blinders on concerning them. Still, I'd much rather have read something about the "Bourgeois Blues" than "Two Tribes."

Even among the modern music the author does highlight, there is some head-scratching on my part. Does Dorian Lynskey honestly believe that Huggy Bear is more representative of Riot Grrrl than Bikini Kill? Does he not believe that Patti Smith's song "People Have The Power" is even worth mentioning? Doesn't he see the implicit revolutionary aspect of the entire DIY culture / "indie scene," in which the "workers" have seized the means of production?

This is still a worthwhile book. I learned quite a bit about such artists as Crass, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Victor Jara and Feli Kuti. While I would not say that it is at all definitive, it is a good start.
5.0 su 5 stelle received in great condition. 6 marzo 2015
Di Frank J. Vasti - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
Ordered for my grandson in college, received in great condition.