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Do I Hear a Waltz [Original Broadway Cast] Import

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4,2 su 5 stelle 29 recensioni clienti su Amazon.com

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Amazon.com: 4.2 su 5 stelle 29 recensioni
5.0 su 5 stelle I hear the waltz, and it makes me want to dance! 13 luglio 2016
Di Mark Waltz - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Audio CD Acquisto verificato
This is a nice original recording of the only work Richard Rodgers and Stephen Sondheim did together, and while their off-screen relationship was rather rocky according to rumor, old school Rodgers and new school Sondheim seem to be twirling a baton between them as the king of Broadway musicals of the 1940's and 50's hands it off to the king of the 1970's and 80's during a time when Broadway was in danger of loosing favor in the public eye. This is far from a perfect show, but having seen it twice (the 2001 revival in Pasadena, also recorded, and the 2016 Encores revival at City Center), I can say it holds a place in my heart, not only for its gorgeous score but the fact that it is sort of a one-woman version of "Follies" that has a heroine, not always likable, but certainly believable. "We're Going to Be Alright" is a pre-cursor to the "Follies" song "Love Will See Us Through", although the original version here cuts out a very racy lyric that Mrs. Rodgers apparently hated. It's hard not to like a score that deals with the issues of flying, and Carol Bruce's "This Week Americans" (followed by a very acerbic reprise) is a deliciously un-p.c. song about prejudices filled with humor. Elizabeth Allen was far too glamorous to be believable as a bitter spinster, but sings the role well. Sergio Franci is romantic in the leading male role, his songs among the finest male ballads ever heard on Broadway. Great supporting performances by such familar faces as Madeline Sherwood ("The Flying Nun") and Stuart Damon ("General Hospital") also add to this show's memorability.
5 di 5 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Glorious Music! Clever Lyrics. Superb Recording! 15 settembre 2012
Di Gentleman Jim - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Audio CD Acquisto verificato
"Do I Hear a Waltz" is an undeniable 'lost gem.' Regardless of how it played on Broadway when it opened, this recording is wonderful to listen to and an inspiration of gloroius musical comedy as it should be written. There is one melodic, tuneful song after another with bright, crisp, poignant lyrics for each of these beautiful songs. It is Richard Rodghers at his most melodious and Stephen Sondheim at his cleverest.

From the opening strains of the music that sets its mood to the end when the music again closes the show, this score is superb. The title song is hauningly beautiful (and huummable!)and the specialty numbers throughout not only add charactrization- which all good songs should- but briskly move the story along and augment the emotions.

No one who invests in this recording will be disappointed if he or she truly loves and appreciates melodic, tuneful, haunting music that undescores a poignant and gentle love story. "The Time of the Cuckoo" as a film is enhanced by the musical treatment of this wonderful score. It is a true joy to listen to and savor.
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Essential for your Collection 21 febbraio 2012
Di Audioampbuilder - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Audio CD Acquisto verificato
Lovers of music are probably always on the search for a suite of works he or she has not heard before-especially composers, interested in "new" melody and tempo ideas. Here is one you definitely want in your collection.
I have immensely enjoyed exploring the labyrinth of opera works, comparing tenors, sopranos, baritones-and the music. But lately I have been collecting any decent this, or previous generation's "musicals". I'm not a music history major, so am not certain, but it seems opera had no heart beat during the 'musical' era of the 50's and 60's. I'd relish hearing from history buffs, and in particular their recommendations.
This one I heartily recommend for one tenor named Sergio Franchi. I was astoudned and pleased, as are so many others on this page. I prefer a baritone tenor..it just sounds more pleasing to me, is all. But this tenor will thrill you. I'm reasonably sure on the "STAY" 'aria'...he intones a gorgeous top A...and if that weren't enough...a third up from there? Wow. Now I am looking for other CD's featuring Sr. Franchi. It saddens me that so much great talent like this flies under the radar. It saddens the poet Thomas Grey also, quote, "Full many a flower is born to blush unseen and waste its sweetness on the desert air..."
The world is such a flock of filthy sheep...whosoever's name is a houshold name...the crowd follows along in worship and praise...practically stepping on singers, and composers who vastly outshine " Mr or Miss most likely to succeed" .

That is nothing more than tabloid mind set...not a clue as to whether that glorious star is actually deserving of worship..never mind that...the crowd is worshipping him/her...so I will too, "therefore" others will think I'm hip and cool, and savvy...NOT. I suppose I am referring to a gal who has become fabulously popular and wealthy, essentially owing to outlandish sartorial extravagance. Loud voice, yes...not a foggy clue about what a 'melody' is. Indeed, the record industry is awash in them for this entire generation in which we live now. History will describe us all as brutes, savages, and "ho's" with tin ears.
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Sondheim provides lyrics, Rogers provides lyricism 6 gennaio 2012
Di Christina Paige - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Audio CD Acquisto verificato
In 1965 no one was going to let a whippersnapper like Stephen Sondheim blast his way through the veils of hypocrisy that shroud relationships. So for the howlingly funny, knife-sharp lyrics to the song "We're Gonna Be All Right" you need to find a modern recording. But this, the original, has a charm other recordings lack. It was recorded in the 60s, so they take themselves seriously, but unselfconsciously, and the voices are lovely. Even this watered down version of Sondheim's signature song is enjoyable. And the other songs.... Wow. Just wow.
The throaty, full voiced delivery of "This Week Americans" by Carol Bruce, with all its transparent cozening, is magnificent. "No Understand" is full of layers, double entendres and nuances , as an illicit romance is planned under cover of a language lesson.
"Someone Woke Up" is a paean to the beauties of a Venice that no longer exists, and Elizabeth Allen's passion will rip your heart out of your chest.
The comedy standout songs, "What Do We do? We Fly" and "Bargaining" range in appeal from juvenile to sophisticated: 6 year olds tend to love the former, with lines like "You're zooming up like a comet, your ears are starting to ring,/Your neighbor's starting to vomit, there's ice along the wing!" while budding thespians love the latter, as Sergio Franchi sings the parts of both the lady shopper and the harried merchant. The new recording does NOT have this comic gem of a song - you'll only get it here!
The killer song is "Stay." This is the song that tears away illusions and self-deceptions. "I am not the dream come true, but stay. You are not the dream come true, but stay. Who is clever? Who is witty? Am I handsome? Are you pretty? No one is the dream come true, but stay, stay, stay...."
What makes this musical so exceptional is the collaboration. Sondheim writes stylish, complex, sometimes-cerebral, sometimes-gutwrenching lyrics. Rogers wrote melodic, singable, hummable music. It was their only collaboration, and Sondheim went on to write his own music, which at first sounded a lot like Mozart, and then became increasingly stylish, complex, cerebral, and atonal. Lots of fun, but not exactly melodic. Here you get the best of words and music. Enjoy. SHARE and enjoy!
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
4.0 su 5 stelle Overlooked Gem 5 maggio 2014
Di Arouet - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Audio CD Acquisto verificato
Almost every song in this unlikely collaboration by Rodgers and Sondheim has a memorable melody and is either witty or poignant. People at the time were put off that it did not have the optimistic, uplifting ending of the Rodgers/Hammerstein canon, and no, it is not a deep dark story like much of Sondheim. No matter, if you are into AMT, this should definitely be in your collection.


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