Non è necessario possedere un dispositivo Kindle. Scarica una delle app Kindle gratuite per iniziare a leggere i libri Kindle sul tuo smartphone, tablet e computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Per scaricare una app gratuita, inserisci il numero di cellulare.

Prezzo Kindle: EUR 3,17

Risparmia EUR 5,37 (63%)

include IVA (dove applicabile)

Queste promozioni verranno applicate al seguente articolo:

Alcune promozioni sono cumulabili; altre non possono essere unite con ulteriori promozioni. Per maggiori dettagli, vai ai Termini & Condizioni delle specifiche promozioni.

Invia a Kindle o a un altro dispositivo

Invia a Kindle o a un altro dispositivo

Nude in Space (English Edition) di [Walker, P.Z.]
Annuncio applicazione Kindle

Nude in Space (English Edition) Formato Kindle


Visualizza tutti i 2 formati e le edizioni Nascondi altri formati ed edizioni
Prezzo Amazon
Nuovo a partire da Usato da
Formato Kindle
"Ti preghiamo di riprovare"
EUR 3,17

Lunghezza: 210 pagine Word Wise: Abilitato Miglioramenti tipografici: Abilitato
Scorri Pagina: Abilitato Lingua: Inglese

Descrizione prodotto

Sinossi

Earth, somewhere in the future. The environment has changed. Cities are large, closed structures with permanent air conditioning, and nudist villages have appeared in the warmer areas.

When space explorers encounter problems while trying to 'tame' a new planet, they turn to the nudist population of earth for help. What will these nude space travellers encounter once they've left earth? And will they be able to return to their home planet?

Dettagli prodotto

  • Formato: Formato Kindle
  • Dimensioni file: 1396 KB
  • Lunghezza stampa: 210
  • Numeri di pagina fonte ISBN: 1500855456
  • Utilizzo simultaneo di dispositivi: illimitato
  • Venduto da: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Lingua: Inglese
  • ASIN: B00MS2Q3QS
  • Da testo a voce: Abilitato
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Abilitato
  • Screen Reader: Supportato
  • Miglioramenti tipografici: Abilitato
  • Media recensioni: Recensisci per primo questo articolo
  • Posizione nella classifica Bestseller di Amazon: #425.882 a pagamento nel Kindle Store (Visualizza i Top 100 a pagamento nella categoria Kindle Store)
  • Hai trovato questo prodotto a un prezzo più basso?
    Se sei un venditore per questo prodotto, desideri suggerire aggiornamenti tramite il supporto venditore?

Recensioni clienti

Non ci sono ancora recensioni di clienti su Amazon.it
5 stelle
4 stelle
3 stelle
2 stelle
1 stella

Le recensioni clienti più utili su Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.8 su 5 stelle 4 recensioni
3 di 3 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Begs for a sequel 6 giugno 2015
Di CuCntry - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
This is good and exciting fiction. It's not advanced degree science any more than Star Trek was. It is simply a good yarn with interesting characters you wish you were friends with, and a novel premise for what is going on with them. What they find on the planet it pretty exciting and just begs and begs for a sequel due to the exciting nature of what is found and the hint of the possible future conflict between those who are good and those who are not.
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Will read more 25 settembre 2015
Di DON BEARD - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
I liked it and will be get more books by this author. I have started reading his Naked Crow series and look forward to his next sci-fi.
1 di 1 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
3.0 su 5 stelle Three Stars 11 marzo 2016
Di James P Liebmann - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
I enjoyed the descriptions of the struggles some characters had in adjusting (or not) to living without clothes.
1 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
2.0 su 5 stelle Good try. 10 aprile 2015
Di Brachiopod - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina flessibile Acquisto verificato
A “treatise novel” is crafted to advance a particular agenda or ideal, usually social or political. Nude in Space is a vehicle for the promotion of naturism (nudism). This is fine; as a utopian principle, clothes-free living has been around a long time and has been nurtured and expounded on by many thoughtful people of considerable talent. As a naturist, this reviewer finds the book to authentically convey the delight and advantages of life in the buff. That ends the positive comments. I have this odd quirk of thinking that science fiction might have some meaningful relationship to, um, science. I understand that in fiction, the present limits of science are likely to be stretched, and that the reader is not in the market for a physics lecture or chemistry textbook. Nevertheless, I do not think it too much to ask an author at least show some respect for what we do know of how the universe operates. This book utterly fails to do so. Early on in the narrative we learn humanity has screwed up Earth’s climate, a common enough trope, but apparently the result includes arctic conditions at the equator with hot spots elsewhere. Sorry, but any situation like that is going to take a heck of a lot more messing with Earth than just its climate – like tidal locking in synchronous rotation. Our intrepid nudist travelers are told before their arrival at planet CX298 (a designation that, by the way, ignores our standard exoplanet labeling system) that there are pretty little floaters in its atmosphere that settle on clothing and eat it away, while leaving bare skin unscathed. Well, I was looking forward to the book’s characters encountering this peculiar phenomenon in person and studying how such an ability would have evolved on a planet without any humans, clothed or otherwise. How did these floaters develop such an adaptation to a native ecological niche? I didn’t expect a convincing answer, really, but was disappointed the question was not even asked. Over and over, the reader encounters a lack of authorial adventure in this supposedly exotic world. The characters travel hardly at all from base camp; the action is constricted almost as if it were on a movie back lot. They spend a lot of time walking trails through forest and grassland (suspiciously similar to terrestrial flora). Attempts at planting Earth vegetables are generally unsuccessful, but there is not a whisper of explanation, and apparently some native life forms are lethal if eaten, but there is no reference to any serious attempt to find out why. The characters just seem to be puzzled a lot. One gets the impression that humanity may have figured out how to do interstellar travel but when it comes to biochemistry is still stuck somewhere around 1890. Finally, there are plot holes big enough to drive a space cruiser through. Among many ripe for discussion is (spoiler alert) that bad local water triggers an armed uprising and an abrupt decision by the camp commander to simply abandon the human settlement attempt altogether, without searching for water from a more distant source or even analyzing the water they had. Gee, the guys who drank this water threw up! Let’s forget the whole thing and go back to Earth! On the whole, this book was fascinating in the way that one is entertained by blooper videos. If it were made into a movie, it could become a cult sensation like Sharknado – so bad it’s wonderful. In that scenario, the nudity would be a big plus, I suppose. One regrets, however, that the underlying premise, which had a lot of potential, was so poorly served by its delivery.
click to open popover