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The Parliament of Poets: An Epic Poem (English Edition) di [Glaysher, Frederick]
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Recensione

"A great epic poem of startling originality and universal significance, which is ingeniously enriching the canon of 'literary epics' while in every way partaking of the nature of world literature. Frederick Glaysher is in a creative dialog with the greatest epic poets of all time. He is bringing together in beautiful verse form...diverse visions of humanity from all over the world. ...frequently casting them in the form of spatial and cosmic imagery. That is very exalting to the reader's spirit. ...the 'oneness' of humankind in a different light. ...a pure joy; embodied in a literary work of fine verbal art, it is contemporary 'world literature' at its best." —Dr. Hans-George Ruprecht, CKCU Literary News, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

"Very readable and intriguingly enjoyable. This epic poem is a journey through vision, thoughts and words of the likes of Cervantes, Basho, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, griots, shamans and many other notables, including Job and Merlin. “All humanity stood there with us. / We were not alone. We felt it. / The Love of the Unseen Essence, encircling us.” Frederick Glaysher’s hours of dedication have produced a masterpiece that will stand the test of time." —Poetry Cornwall, No.36, England.

"Most of the contemporary poets and critics claim that epic is not suitable for our modern age. But Frederick Glaysher has proven them wrong.... 'The Parliament of Poets' has all the grandeur, all the loftiness and qualities which make an 'effort for an epic' a 'true epic.' In essence, 'The Parliament of Poets' is a song of unity, an audacious declaration that unity does not mean conformity, it means being in harmony. The poet himself is the main character of this epic poem, who travels to the moon, meets a large number of great poets and writers of the world, comes back to earth to have some glimpses of bygone times. Throughout the entire journey, many poets, writers, sages guide the poet and share their invaluable knowledge and insights." —Ratul Pal, Goodreads, Bangladesh.

"...a beautiful poem that falls off the tongue smoothly. All through this epic poem, the Poet of the Moon is addressing or discussing the Buddhist concept of Itai Doshin or the unity of the mind in the midst of diversity, which is also the concept that underpins the Ubuntu philosophy, which translates into 'I am, because we are'. The poet talks about peaceful coexistence, that oneness of us as a people of the earth and with our environment. He sees rapacious quest for wealth as unhealthy, impacting negatively on us as a people.... In effect the poet wants to see the unity of what he calls 'false dichotomies': science and religion, reason and intuition, material and spiritual, white and black, and others. ...an excellent piece of poetry." —Nana Fredua-Agyeman, ImageNations, Accra, Ghana, Africa.

"I found this book to be up to the standards set by Homer. ...This book also is very thought provoking as it brings into question what humanity is doing to the Earth and each other." —LibraryThing, Texas.

Recensione

"A great epic poem of startling originality and universal significance, which is ingeniously enriching the canon of 'literary epics' while in every way partaking of the nature of world literature. Frederick Glaysher is in a creative dialog with the greatest epic poets of all time. He is bringing together in beautiful verse form...diverse visions of humanity from all over the world. ...frequently casting them in the form of spatial and cosmic imagery. That is very exalting to the reader's spirit. ...the 'oneness' of humankind in a different light. ...a pure joy; embodied in a literary work of fine verbal art, it is contemporary 'world literature' at its best." —Dr. Hans-George Ruprecht, CKCU Literary News, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

"Very readable and intriguingly enjoyable. This epic poem is a journey through vision, thoughts and words of the likes of Cervantes, Basho, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, griots, shamans and many other notables, including Job and Merlin. “All humanity stood there with us. / We were not alone. We felt it. / The Love of the Unseen Essence, encircling us.” Frederick Glaysher’s hours of dedication have produced a masterpiece that will stand the test of time." —Poetry Cornwall, No.36, England.

"Most of the contemporary poets and critics claim that epic is not suitable for our modern age. But Frederick Glaysher has proven them wrong.... 'The Parliament of Poets' has all the grandeur, all the loftiness and qualities which make an 'effort for an epic' a 'true epic.' In essence, 'The Parliament of Poets' is a song of unity, an audacious declaration that unity does not mean conformity, it means being in harmony. The poet himself is the main character of this epic poem, who travels to the moon, meets a large number of great poets and writers of the world, comes back to earth to have some glimpses of bygone times. Throughout the entire journey, many poets, writers, sages guide the poet and share their invaluable knowledge and insights." —Ratul Pal, Goodreads, Bangladesh.

"...a beautiful poem that falls off the tongue smoothly. All through this epic poem, the Poet of the Moon is addressing or discussing the Buddhist concept of Itai Doshin or the unity of the mind in the midst of diversity, which is also the concept that underpins the Ubuntu philosophy, which translates into 'I am, because we are'. The poet talks about peaceful coexistence, that oneness of us as a people of the earth and with our environment. He sees rapacious quest for wealth as unhealthy, impacting negatively on us as a people.... In effect the poet wants to see the unity of what he calls 'false dichotomies': science and religion, reason and intuition, material and spiritual, white and black, and others. ...an excellent piece of poetry." —Nana Fredua-Agyeman, ImageNations, Accra, Ghana, Africa.

"I found this book to be up to the standards set by Homer. ...This book also is very thought provoking as it brings into question what humanity is doing to the Earth and each other." —LibraryThing, Texas.

Dettagli prodotto

  • Formato: Formato Kindle
  • Dimensioni file: 756 KB
  • Lunghezza stampa: 294
  • Utilizzo simultaneo di dispositivi: illimitato
  • Editore: Earthrise Press (25 dicembre 2013)
  • Venduto da: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Lingua: Inglese
  • ASIN: B00AAQCCU0
  • Da testo a voce: Abilitato
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Non abilitato
  • Screen Reader: Supportato
  • Miglioramenti tipografici: Abilitato
  • Media recensioni: Recensisci per primo questo articolo
  • Posizione nella classifica Bestseller di Amazon: #424.562 a pagamento nel Kindle Store (Visualizza i Top 100 a pagamento nella categoria Kindle Store)
  • Hai trovato questo prodotto a un prezzo più basso?

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Amazon.com: 4.3 su 5 stelle 22 recensioni
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle especially if you enjoy literature, wisdom 3 gennaio 2016
Di Anodea Judith - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
I am in awe of the brilliance of this book! Food for the soul, and answers to humanity's most pressing problems, right where they belong, in the epic poetry of all the teachers, magicians, prophets, shamans, and poets of all time... Bravo, bravo, bravo. Everyone must read this book, especially if you enjoy literature, wisdom, and philosophy. We held a poetry salon in honor of this book. It was wonderful! —Anodea Judith, Novato, California, author of The Global Heart Awakens
1 di 1 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Brilliant! 18 aprile 2017
Di Joseph C. Jacobs - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
Brilliant! Rarely now do I read a book in three days. This one I did. My mind and heart were fed. I sent copies to friends. This poem is an anodyne in the era of Trump.
10 di 12 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
4.0 su 5 stelle Brilliance...manque 19 febbraio 2016
Di R. Campbell - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
This is a great book. It's taken me almost a year to get around to writing this little review, because I haven't known what to think. I still don't quite know entirely whether it's deeply great or one of those lovely signs of the sorrows and struggles of our sad times. Its author is about as ambitious as a writer can be. He'd like to rival Cervantes - wouldn't we all? - and to his credit he doesn't suggest that he does. That he aspires so high is probably one of the book's chief strengths. It's the opposite of trivial and that is satisfying in itself.
As I re-peruse it, I realize a slower, deeper reading than my initial one is likely to be more rewarding. That's my fault: Don't read this book for plot! Just to read a modern book written in un-rhymed mostly iambic pentameter, with occasional forays into "the feminine ending, an extra half foot of measure...." (I borrow here of course from his scholarship, in his prefatory remarks on the verse structure he - very effectively to my ear - employs throughout.)
But despite all these dazzlements and genuine delights, on first reading I was a bit disappointed, for many reason, One was simply given the context of that hope of coming close to Cervantes. So far, no - but check back in 400 or so years....
Also, somewhere in the verbiage surrounding this book is mention of Mr. Glaysher having read deeply in modern physics - all that great stuff that seems to turn causation upside down, and everything else with it. I imagine he has, with probably more comprehension most of us literature types feel lucky to achieve. But there's - as far as I can recall - nothing in any detail in this poem about those "facts." I continue to wait for a writer who can weave into our reality the notion, for example, that a universe exists for every possible outcome of every possible choice. (Or did I read that wrong?) (Even the biochemistry of guilt and sin would be an interesting place for a well-informed thinker to start....)
The other main area of disappointment was how Mr. Glaysher - shall we say - approaches the female problem. That's an OK way to put it here, as he doesn't get much beyond that. Goddess bless him, it's not for lack of trying or lack of respect, and those two things matter.
The book is a long poem that involves our hero, the writer, in encounters with great thinkers and writers of the ages. This, not incidentally, is where I found the book most satisfying - Mr. Glaysher's depth of knowledge - unless he's making it all up, and I doubt that - is wonderful. He seems to know everyone's name, everyone's era to a T, everyone's geography and history. The man knows more proper nouns than I thought existed.
Just to reel off names would be fun (and yes, I have the book right here; it's been close to hand the whole year since I bought it): "I gazed,/standing with Ta Chak..." "On this, Dostoyevsky and I could agree [says Tolstoy].... "That's about when Lord Tennyson/and Robert Browning strolled around the corner..." "Fazi ended, stepping lightly back, giving way/to a companion by his side, Kabir, met/also once more. 'Oh master, what a blessing,'/I thought, 'to see you again and hear your/words of wisdom...."
By the way, though these examples don't show it, Glaysher seems too to do a lovely job imitating writers' various voices, at least I can say that for the ones (far from the majority!) whose voices I know.
And OK, I was a little wrong in the point I'm trying to get to, the "problem of the female." He does do more than stand in awe of the Universal Feminine (barely). The book opens with a calling upon to the Muse, "O Maid of Heaven, O Circling Moon...." Good. Then a bunch of men, and I'm actually back in about 1975, and I'm wondering, after reading the albeit fascinating names of about 50 men, when do we get to the women?
Queen Mab is the first lady, if my count is right, to stand in person before us the reader/audience: "Together, Merlin and Queen Mab stood/before the crowd, he holding out his staff,/she clothed in Nature's bountiful plenty,/catching the eye of many poets and seers." OK. I can live with that, though I'm starting to long for Sappho (she does show up a few pages later), Jane Austen, and while you're at it, how about a few I've never heard of, since that seems to be your forte?
To his credit - tho if he hadn't I wouldn't be writing this, nor have finished reading the book - he does get to "them." All too often though instead of writers and thinkers (OK, History is the villain) he invokes goddesses and muses, e.g. Calliope, as in the following scene, where Cervantes ends his challenge to our Poet and glances towards the Muse, "all eyes following, her beauty, ever/youthful, in her wisdom, inspiring vision in her small band of devoted ones...."
And while I'm at it, I do have to remark - perhaps a bit nastily but I'm not the one who put this on the page - the "diaphanous gown" she's wearing in this scene is probably one of maybe 20 such that various ladies are said to wear herein.... I'm wondering at least tell me what color those gowns are, and maybe the cut, and how about shoes...?
Yes, I'm in the same construct - born and raised in the American Midwest 1950s - I can't be Donna Reed, so I'll settle for ever-youthful beauty in a diaphanous gown impressing lots of "devoted ones...." I just was disappointed he couldn't get further beyond that sooner. As I don't have that ever-youthful beauty either, I've been trying to find something else for lots of years now, and I wish he could have helped. How about an ugly woman, for a start? (Never mind, if she was "beautiful inside" as we used to say, he'd find her beautiful.)
So upon re-reading, searching through the various diaphanous gowns - I realize, in answer to "what's your problem, reader?" - my problem is his audience seems to be men, not men and women. And thus he's writing to himself and other men about (among other things) women. It's that simple, thus not really offensive at all, just ... I thought we'd ... never mind.
And in the end - his vision tries to encompass what many of us perhaps even more ineptly sense, the impending ascension of a feminine (how limited a word!) vision for our next stage in being...? I can see where one owes Glaysher credit for getting beyond at least that level of thought: he wants to follow the admonition he records/transcribes, the vision he finds, to "hear the voices of guiding elders/grandmothers and mothers/daughters and sisters/ wives and babies/hear the fathers of village traditions/hear their one voice...."
That by the way is the voice of "Sogdolon, King Sundiata's mother, the good sorceress of ancient Mali, from the griot tradition." Or, rather, Mr. Glaysher's hearing of it. But that's a lot, a huge gift. Very nice to make your acquaintance, Madame Sogdolon, the more I think about this the more I feel honored to meet you, and humbled." And thank you, Mr. Glaysher, for effecting the introduction - one of perhaps thousands such (though, OK, mostly to men) he accomplishes in these 290 or so pages. No small gift.
One more tiny cavil - Mr. Glaysher does have a hobby-horse - "the nihilism of Deconstruction..." which he ties, if I understand aright, to origins in the European "Enlightenment" of the 18th century. Really? I thought Voltaire was cool, and as for Deconstruction, it makes me feel lucky, rather than deprived, to sense one learns about that only in graduate college English departments, from which I've been spared ....
So my comment about "Enlightenment" is "Voltaire was cool" - here's where I value and admire Glaysher - he would have a whole lot more to say, and in more detail, and much more precise and intellectually rigorous than anything I could come up with. I hope I'd have the sense to chill on the anti-academia chit-chat and listen.
And yet in his oft-repeated humbleness - which I think is genuine - he is charming too. And I don't think he's been riding the ever-slowing gravy train that was American academia. It feels like he has paid and keeps paying his dues.
Which reminds me of what I felt at the - wait for it - or don't - glorious ending (? well, given the build-up, I dunno...) of this poem: I really look forward to reading the next volume, Mr. Glaysher. There's more to say and I think you are probably already busy finding the words. I shelled out $25 or so for this book, which I almost never do - hurrah for public libraries though they don't have everything - and I don't regret it. As I take up this book again after many months, I realize I'm still thinking about it. And as I page through I find again lots and lots of loveliness.
I think I'll put it by my bed as something to read bits of as I go to sleep, or when I wake up. Can't imagine better book-bound company.
1 di 1 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Five Stars 13 ottobre 2016
Di Mary Weinberg - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
A great readThank You.
7 di 8 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle AWESOME BOOK!! 13 gennaio 2014
Di Kelly - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
This was ordered as a gift and I have to admit I had a hard time letting it go! Highly recommend both the book and the seller!
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