EUR 23,81
  • Tutti i prezzi includono l'IVA.
Spedizione gratuita per ordini sopra EUR 29.
Disponibilità immediata.
Venduto e spedito da Amazon. Confezione regalo disponibile.
Twitter and Tear Gas: The... è stato aggiunto al tuo carrello

Spedire a:
Per vedere gli indirizzi, per favore
Oppure
Inserisci un codice postale corretto.
Oppure
Ne hai uno da vendere?
Passa al retro Passa al fronte
Ascolta Riproduzione in corso... In pausa   Stai ascoltando un campione dell'edizione audio udibile.
Maggiori informazioni
Visualizza l'immagine

Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest (Inglese) Copertina rigida – 2 mag 2017

4,5 su 5 stelle
5 stelle
10
4 stelle
0
3 stelle
0
2 stelle
0
1 stella
1
4,5 su 5 stelle 11 recensioni dagli USA

Visualizza tutti i 2 formati e le edizioni Nascondi altri formati ed edizioni
Prezzo Amazon
Nuovo a partire da Usato da
Formato Kindle
"Ti preghiamo di riprovare"
Copertina rigida
"Ti preghiamo di riprovare"
EUR 23,81
EUR 19,10 EUR 27,38
Nota: Questo articolo può essere consegnato in un punto di ritiro. Dettagli
Ritira il tuo ordine dove e quando preferisci.
  • Scegli tra gli oltre 8.500 punti di ritiro in Italia
  • I clienti Prime beneficiano di consegne illimitate presso i punti di ritiro senza costi aggiuntivi
Come inviare un ordine presso un punto di ritiro Amazon.
  1. Trova il tuo punto di ritiro preferito ed aggiungilo alla tua rubrica degli indirizzi
  2. Indica il punto di ritiro in cui vuoi ricevere il tuo ordine nella pagina di conferma d’ordine
Maggiori informazioni
click to open popover

Non è necessario possedere un dispositivo Kindle. Scarica una delle app Kindle gratuite per iniziare a leggere i libri Kindle sul tuo smartphone, tablet e computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Per scaricare una app gratuita, inserisci il numero di cellulare.



Dettagli prodotto

Recensioni clienti

Non ci sono ancora recensioni di clienti su Amazon.it
5 stelle
4 stelle
3 stelle
2 stelle
1 stella

Le recensioni clienti più utili su Amazon.com (beta) (Potrebbero essere presenti recensioni del programma "Early Reviewer Rewards")

Amazon.com: 4.5 su 5 stelle 11 recensioni
21 di 21 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle This book displays a deep understanding of what constitutes mass ... 17 aprile 2017
Di David Parry - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
This book displays a deep understanding of what constitutes mass protest in the 21st century. Tufekci manages to blend quantitative knowledge with qualitative insight. Rather than being one of the many "tech will save us" or "tech will ruin us" books already in existence this book manages a far more insightful and nuanced approach. What emerges is a complex understanding of this phenomena with some surprising conclusions and insights. As a professor of digital media I'll be using this book in my classes.
16 di 16 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Thoughtful, clear, and important 30 aprile 2017
Di Paul - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
This is a remarkable book, and a rare blend of thoughtful scholarly analysis, first-hand reporting from sites of critical political importance, practical lessons for social media activists, and delightfully clear and compelling writing. Few people have the experience and perspective on social media and contemporary political activism that Zeynep Tufekci demonstrates here, and the book undercuts easy rhetorics of "Twitter-powered revolutions" or of "slacktivism". It shows that social media have hugely important roles to play in political mobilization, but that the story of the relationship between those spheres of experience is a complicated one. Great stuff.
8 di 8 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Must read for the socially-conscious netizen of today! 12 maggio 2017
Di KF6GPE - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
This is a must-read for anyone --- lay person or academic --- interested in the increasing role the Internet and social media has played in recent protests around the globe. Tufecki draws on her extensive first-hand experience with movements that have used recent technologies from the Zapatistas through Occupy and recent events in the Middle East and the last US presidental election, looking at how today's networked platforms can be easily co-opted by small groups to reach large audiences and the resulting successes and failures, contrasting the work with earlier movements such as the American civil rights movement of the 1960s. Given her cultural heritage, she presents an especially interesting and personal account of events in Turkey as they apply to today's networks.

Three areas of the book really stand out to me: her observations and anecdotes about how today's platforms enable very small groups of people to drive large movements very quickly; the advantages and disadvantages these movements have because they are generally consensually led rather than hierarchical, and the close relationship between users, the corporations of the social platforms they use, and their interaction with the nation-states in which they operate.

Tufecki also advances the capacities and signals model for how these networks operate. There I think she might have done somewhat better --- or perhaps I lost the thread of her argument, as my background is more technical than sociological. The model seems sound (although I am not qualified to dispute it), but could have been called out more clearly in some ways from her relating of specific observations and trends. To her credit, she does a good job of summarizing the model in both the introduction and conclusion. This may be a weak point to the academic reader, although I imagine her model is --- or will be --- better-covered in her writing targeted specifically at that audience.

The material she presents is accessible to anyone, but I think has special value for three groups of people: those attempting to implement change using today's networked mediums, those studying trends and developments in Internet culture, and those working on Internet technologies that should be aware that their work has real social consequences that are difficult to foresee in advance.
8 di 8 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle Reason among Chaos 5 maggio 2017
Di Steve - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Formato Kindle Acquisto verificato
I liked the vast expanse of her interest and how she consistently returned the reader to her core concepts. She focuses the lens of her camera from precision with little depth of field to wide angles that give a broad perspective of the many characters and factors involved. I think she clearly sees digital communications as a tool and as such, tools cut both ways. Its well worth the read to catch a glimpse at this woman's often unique look at the forces changing the world. Well done!
2 di 2 persone hanno trovato utile la seguente recensione
5.0 su 5 stelle and on the other hand she is like a war correspondent from the trenches where the action ... 19 maggio 2017
Di Faruk - Pubblicato su Amazon.com
Formato: Copertina rigida Acquisto verificato
Ms Zeynep Tufekci combines scholar serioussnes and academic rigour with journalistic flair and courage, a rare treat for the reader. On the one hand she is a career sociologist, and on the other hand she is like a war correspondent from the trenches where the action is, hence the “teargas” in the title of her book. Scientists with a knack for words have always been sought after by the media, like Richard Feynman, Carl Sagan, Oliver Sachs, Michio Kaku, Marcus de Sautoy simply because they have been able to explain the most unexplainable in everyday language. Since Zeynep is a social scientist, she is more fortunate than physical or life scientists, she can use vernacular language to convey her expertise. That is why the New York Times has invited her as a op-ed columnist. For her assets it is only natural that she is the second most followed sociologist with 246,502 followers on twitter after Michael Eric Dyson. In her book, she tackles the thorny issue of free speech and libertarian values versus authoritarianism through the prism of information and communication technologies. Her verdict is not rosy: Yes, ICT may facilitate a torrent of protest, but if the protest doesn’t evolve into a political stream, it simply evaporates.